Shared from Artnet News

Since the tragic events that transpired in Charlottesville, South Carolina, last August, a fierce debate about what should be done with problematic monuments has been raging—and not just in the United States. In Europe, colonial-era monuments pose a particular problem. Like monuments to the confederacy in the US, sculptures memorializing European colonizers are rarely combined…

via Belgium Has a Racist Monuments Problem Too—Here’s How They’re Dealing With It — artnet News

Daily Prompt:The Developers

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Picture from January 2015

Make way: make way

The developers say

As their wrecking balls

Crash down the walls.

Condemned as unfit

The buildings are split

Ridding them of trouble

Turning all to rubble

For once it’s all razed

There’s money to be made

Erecting posh offices

Or executive pads.

Never mind how we feel

The development’s a steal

For those with power

Over the poor.

And I ask

“Have you an inkling

Of the grief we are thinking

When you split our community apart?”

 

In the East End of London, Spitalfields, many homes and buildings have been demolished and replaced with high cost housing or expensive office blocks. This has tended to price the local people out of the area, break up communities and bring in new residents who have no close ties to the community. Often buildings could have been improved but there is more money in doing them up for a different market or other things. On the positive side, the Street Artists have moved in and taken advantage of bare walls and fencing to display their work. One of my favourites was the madonna-like figure on the end wall behind the hoarding in my photograph above. The area around Brick Lane is a mecca for  restaurants and tourists. But for local people who want to stay, it is impossible – it can be over a million pounds for a 2 bedroom apartment!  There have been protests against the ‘gentrification’ of the area but money always wins.

Screenshot 2018-01-28 15.18.23

Screenshot from Google Maps, shows a demolition site in the heart of Spitalfields.

Photos and words copyright Englepip©

 

 

via Daily Prompt: Inkling

London (architecture old and new)

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I scan the horizon and wonder

Which building will today

Dominate the skyline.

Vying for height, shape and spectacle

They rise, in London, to the sky:

Above the smog.

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2003, The Gherkin: rocket or vegetable?

Love it or hate it: amusing cuteness.

2014, Walkie Talkie leaning tower,  

Sky garden overhang

TV screening a view of the rest.

But 2012 was The Shard.

Aloof, a proud spike: icicle upended.

Taller than the rest.

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Should we revere these pinnacles of modernity? 

In a world moving onwards and definitely upwards.

Or look back to Wren, St Paul’s sublime dome

From the east obliterated now by steel and glass.

 

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Should we recreate the romance of the past

Shakespeare’s and Wanamaker’s Globe

Reliving nightly the fifteenth century

In the twenty first?

 

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Defend, promote, revive,

Preserve, destroy, reuse?

Infil, demolish, redesign.

 

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Architecture:

A spirit of each age.

What will it bring tomorrow?

 

Photos and wording copyright Englepip©

 

via Daily Prompt: Dominant

Daily Prompt: Omniscient eye

 

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Your eye catches mine

And in an instant I am drawn

To your unblinking stare

Which digs deep into

My soul.

That eye drills

Into my very being

And holds me

To account.

Who could surmise

That such innocence

Was so omniscient.

 

I was travelling by bus when this child – no more than 18 months and sitting on its mother’s knee in front me, captured my attention, staring unblinking into my own eye. Seemingly the toddler could see my very thoughts. It was an eerie experience which I have remembered for years. I had to look away to break the spell. The title in the daily prompts brought it all back to me, now.

Photo and poem copyright Englepip ©

via Daily Prompt: Blink

Photo Challenge: One day

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One day

The squawking chick will  grow

To be a carbon copy of its mother

Speckled hen crossing the dry grass.

One day its feathers will be more

Beautiful and consistent with

What a hen is supposed to be,

And it will grow a red comb or wattle

On its head, and its beady eye

Will know what to look for to eat.

But for now it will stick

Close to its mother for comfort

And protection and to learn

How to behave

When it is grown.

via Photo Challenge: Growth